The Elephant’s Journey by Jose Saramago

the-elephants-journey-saramagoAfter arriving in Lisbon, Solomon – he was an elephant – was immediately forgotten, living in a pen that became increasingly dirty after year by year. Fast forward a few years later, we have the king and the queen, trying to debate what to give the Archduke as a wedding gift. That was when the queen remembered Solomon and suggested to the king to give Solomon to the Archduke. The King agreed because it was a good idea after all.

Solomon was enjoying his nice peaceful life in Lisbon after a long journey from Goa, has now become a wedding present from the King of Portugal to the Archduke Maximilian. Giving an elephant to the Archduke was seen as a very symbolic move for the nation, as it’s not everyday a King would give someone an elephant as a wedding gift. Those symbolic ceremonies, where the King had to bring himself to visit the elephant in his pen and the Archduke Maximilian officially accepting the gift by changing Solomon’s name to Suleiman, (of course he’s still referred to as Solomon in the novel), Solomon needed to begin a really long journey from Lisbon to Vienna, where he had to travel on land and water.

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The Invisible Man by H.G Wells

the-invisible-manIn the introduction written by W. Warren Wager, he tells us that out of all the novels that HG Wells had written, there were four books that were more known than all the others. The books were the Time Machine,  the War of the Worlds, the Island of Dr. Moreau and finally, The Invisible Man. Warren Wager muses that these books are well known due to the violence inside the book. Through the book, H. G Wells revealed the ‘invisible’s man’ personality little by little through each passing chapter, and how his personality isn’t something.

The story started with a stranger person, also called a stranger appearing at a small village at Ipping, in West Susex in the middle of winter. Strangely, he was wrapped up to the point where no part of himself could be seen at all, except for a little pink nose protruding from the bandages obscuring his face. He was weird enough to scare the innkeeper and everyone else in the inn, with his demands to let him stay in the room and to not be disturbed at all. What was more perplexing was the bottles that arrived the next day–loads and loads of chemicals in them, hinting that this possible stranger could have been a doctor.

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Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz

aristotle-and-dante-discover-the-secrets-of-the-universeWhen I pulled out this book from its package and read the synopsis in the back of it, I realized in five heartbeats that this book was going to be a gay romance book. I pretty much had bad experiences reading romance books in the past (I mean, I don’t like Fault in our Stars, like every other normal person on this earth) and at that point, I do support LGBT relationships. Except that I wasn’t quite ready yet to read a novel about it.

But the cover of the novel itself was crammed with a lot of awards. There was the Stonewall book award, the Pure Belpre award, the Lambda Literary Award and the Micheal Printz award, meaning that this is a very promising book. So I walked over to the nearest sofa, and curled up, book in hand and begun to read.

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Thropy Hunting: You Don’t Have to ‘Catch Them All’

2016_09_05_11209_1473060651-_largeMy newest article in The Jakarta Post on September 5, 2016: http://www.thejakartapost.com/youth/2016/09/05/trophy-hunting-you-dont-have-to-catch-them-all.html

The complete article:

Trophy Hunting: You Don’t Have to ‘Catch Them All’

Pokemon Go has been booming since it was released last month. Everybody seems to be playing the game, which involves the player walking around and throwing Pokeballs to catch the digital monster, called Pokemon. The logic of the game is simple enough: The player simply needs to catch, collect and use the Pokemon to battle Pokemon gyms.

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Kappa by Ryunosuke Akutagawa

kappaA Kappa could be called a demon, or an imp in Japanese folklore. They are described to be a creature with the form of a human, but about the size of a child, ranging from colors of green, yellow and blue. Kappas is said to inhibit the water bodies of Japan. Kappas could resemble a kind of amphibian, with webbed feet and the ability to ‘smell like a fish’ and swim like them. As interesting as a Kappa would sound, there’s one hardcore fact driven down. They do not exist. A Kappa is entirely fictional, and originates from myths. Same goes to every dragons, demons, and imps out there.

This story is supposed to be the past experience of a person who was living in the insane asylum under the title of a madman. The story itself has been told many times throughout the hospital, to the other inmates and interested visitors. The patient was depicted to be very calm, and polite during the story sessions, except at a very certain and touchy part which would cause the mad part of him to surface. The doctors did agree that it was a very interesting story. It could be possible that the patient was having acute schizophrenia, which explained his visions throughout the epilogue about the kappas and his sudden mood swings.

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