Animal Farm by George Orwell

animal_farm-3The story Animal Farm is one of my mom’s books. She seemed to like it and suddenly started reading the book out loud for us. But she never went reading after Chapter Two. Maybe because my sister was not really listening. My mom told me to continue the book all by myself. So I started.

Animal Farm was a story mostly about pigs and horses and sheep and donkeys and goats and even a cat and dogs. Even chicken and ducks. Of course, they had an owner, named Mr. Jones. Their farm was not even called “Animal Farm” by then, but “Manor Farm.”

One night, there was this big old pig called Major. Major called up a meeting and he made up a speech. A speech was about his dream that one day the animals would have a rebellion. He told them about their labor. In full spirit, he taught them a song called “Beast of England.”

Three days later, Major passed away in his sleep. Some intelligent animals were thinking about his speech.They did not know the rebellion Major had predicted would come true but they knew they should prepare for it. The work of teaching and organizing fell upon the pigs who were the smartest animals in the farm.

Soon, the farm animals were forgotten to be fed. Even the wheat was failed to be taken care off because the farmers were drunk. The animals had enough of it. They were hungry and the cows needed to be milked. So the pigs, Snowball and Napoleon set out the rebellion.

After managing to shoo the farmers and won the farm, they started to work on the crops. Snowball and Napoleon became the leader and wrote some commandments. There were seven in all like:

1. Whatever goes upon two legs is an enemy.
2. Whatever goes on four legs, or has wings is a friend.
3. No animal shall wear clothes.
4. No animal shall sleep in a bed.
5. No animal shall drink alcohol.
6. No animal shall kill other animal.
7. All animals are equal.

First, the animals lived happily ever after, even working together to stop Mr. Jones from recapturing the farm. One of the pigs, Snowball was exiled because he was working for the humans. And mysterious things was beginning to happen.

The pigs started sleeping on the human bed. Napoleon said that the windmill plan Snowball had made was actually his. Jessie’s and Bluebell’s puppies became his bodyguards. One by one, the pigs broke the rules they had made with lame excuses.They drank alcohol and killed other animals since Napoleon suspected they were Snowball’s spies. Napoleon made allies with humans. The windmill was ruined. The song ‘Beast of England’ was banned. They even started using human guns!

After time went by, many animals died because of old age. The sheep that had bleated ‘Four legs good, two legs bad!’ started to bleat ‘four legs good, two legs better!’ย The pigs began walking on two legs holding whips! But Clove, the horse was still alive, although she couldn’t read the rules she knew. Yet another rule had changed so she asked Benjamin, the donkey, to read it out for her.

There was only one rule left. And it was: ALL ANIMALS ARE EQUAL. BUT SOME ANIMALS ARE MORE EQUAL THAN OTHERS.

The pigs were now human like.

***

This story, I was told, is a very grown up story. But I still read it.

My mom asked me what the story symbolized. In my opinion, we should not depend too much on a leader that we think as a good leader, after the old one is stepped down. The good leader may pick up the old leader’s mean habits.

The book is quite like the Aesop’s fables, because it has a high moral standard. Even the writer himself calls it as a fairy story. The rule “All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others’ is similar with my own created statement ‘All humans are equal, but some humans are more equal than others’. Except if you are a communist.

All in all, ‘Animal Farm’ is a weird and entertaining book.

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2 thoughts on “Animal Farm by George Orwell

  1. Hi, Elysa thank for reviewed this book. The story itself just… interesting. Kind of remind me to us, humans in real life :b. Would like to see more of your posts :))

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